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Posted by on Oct 12, 2011 in Fringe, General Show Info, Podcasts | 3 comments

Episode 0407- Feedback for “Alone in the World”

Episode 0407- Feedback for “Alone in the World”

In this episode of The Fringe Podcast, Clint and Darrell take and discuss your feedback on the Fringe season 4 episode, “Alone in the World.”  We marvel at the high bunsen burner ratings, Read two completely different takes on the episode, and discuss what has happened to the Blueverse Machine. We receive and discuss a Fringe Podcast first, and Darrell adds a fans’ bunsen burner to his TOP Three Bunsen Burner ratings of all time. Stay with us.

Link to the Fringe comic, Beyond the Fringe #1B
Send in your thoughts and theories to 304-837-2278 or feedback@thefringepodcast.com.

3 Comments

  1. When I click on your iTunes subscribe icon on my iPad, it pops a dialogue box that says the address is invalid.

    • That’s because it is a specialized link that is designed to launch iTunes on a Mac or PC. Since the iPad doesn’t have the regular iTunes application, the iPad doesn’t know what to do with the link.

  2. I agree with you that this was a pretty generic season 1-ish monster-of-the-week episode. The things is, though, when they so bold-facedly fail to explain things or put them into a larger story context, I tend think that’s less laziness and more playing possum. Specifically, one of the fringe sciences from this season’s credit sequence is “psychogenisis.” I think they’re going to realize that, in the orange verse, there’s some heightened projection of certain people’s emotions into externalized living forms. This is what is going to lead them to bringing the kid back and explaining more of his story and the mechanism by which his inner life ended up projected into Gus. How this may end up leading to Walter and Olivia being able to call Peter’s physical form back into existence.

    They are, and have been for pretty much the whole series, been working on ways in which certain people’s strong emotional lives can become physically manifest. I think Gus is just an extension of that established Fringe trope.

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